Archives: Court Decisions

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Court of Appeal Provides Timely Reminder Regarding a Contractor’s Use of Property for Staging and Proper Calculation of Damages for Demise of Redwood Tree

In a recent unpublished Court of Appeal decision, Downs v. City of Redding (October 30, 2018), the Court took up two distinct issues: (a) whether a contractor’s use of property for construction staging constitutes a taking when such use is not authorized by the agency, and (b) whether “just compensation” requires payment of damages for the taking of a … Continue Reading

Court Affirms Coastal Commission’s Consideration of Takings Issues

The California Coastal Act establishes another layer of regulation governing “development” in the Coastal Zone. Development under the Coastal Act is defined to encompass essentially everything and anything.  For example, under the Coastal Act development includes such things as a lot line adjustment, releasing fireworks on the 4th of July, or putting up a “No … Continue Reading

Improper CEQA Determination Does Not Trigger Regulatory Taking

When a governmental agency improperly denies a permit application for a new development, and the proposed development is thereby delayed, does this result in a regulatory taking?  As we’ve seen in some prior cases, such improper governmental actions can trigger liability, but it is uncommon.  A recent Court of Appeal decision, Bottini v. City of San Diego (Sept. … Continue Reading

Another Regulatory Takings Case Gets Lost in the Procedural Maze

For those of you who have followed Nossaman’s eminent domain blog since the very early days, you’ll recall our coverage of a significant regulatory takings case, Monks v. City of Rancho Palos Verdes.  The 2008 California decision received much press coverage in that it was one of the very few instances where property owners overcame the myriad … Continue Reading

New Eminent Domain Opinion Discusses Admissibility Rules for Valuation Witnesses

One of the unique things about eminent domain cases is that a set of specific procedural rules govern the admissibility of valuation evidence at trial.  A new unpublished opinion from the Court of Appeal, San Bernardino County Transportation Authority v. Byun, explores some of the many things that can go wrong when a party ignores … Continue Reading

Is Meaningful Eminent Domain Reform Finally On The Horizon?

Many states have enacted eminent domain reform since the U.S. Supreme Court’s 2005 decision in Kelo v. City of New London, which broadly defined “public use” to include the government’s acquiring property for another private owner to realize an economic benefit (such as increasing tax revenues).  However, as reported by the Institute for Justice in its 50 States Report … Continue Reading

Another Inverse Condemnation Temporary Damages Claim Fails to Get Off the Ground

As we’ve seen all too many times in California, when local municipalities delay development approvals — even improperly — courts are reluctant to find liability under an inverse condemnation cause of action and award temporary damages. While there have been some successful cases (see Lockaway Storage v. County of Alameda (2013) 216 Cal.App.4th 161), those … Continue Reading

Important New Decision Impacting Legal Issues Motions in California Inverse Condemnation Cases

As any experienced California eminent domain lawyer knows, there is a unique statutory mechanism that allows parties to bring a legal issues motion to secure a court’s ruling on a litany of issues that impact compensation. This statutory right is set forth in Code of Civil Procedure section 1260.040 and reads as follows: “(a)          If there … Continue Reading

When Condemnation Actions Go Wrong

In the vast majority of cases, when a public agency exercises eminent domain, the only issue in dispute is the amount of just compensation the agency must pay for the property being acquired.  Even in situations where a property owner challenges the agency’s right to take, it is typically for procedural reasons that can ultimately … Continue Reading
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