Archives: Valuation

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Transmission Line Proximity Damages — Real or Just Perceived?

Having recently worked on a number of pipeline and transmission line projects, I find the issue of proximity damages to be fascinating.  Does being adjacent to gas pipelines or electrical transmission lines diminish the value of an owner’s remaining property?  I have seen studies suggesting nearly every possible conclusion.  If you’re interested in this subject, … Continue Reading

Appraisal Institute’s Valuation Magazine – The Art of Easements

Acquiring a fee interest in property seems to be so out-of-style.  Nearly every linear infrastructure project I work on now involves the acquisition of various types of easements, whether its a typical temporary construction easement, access easement, street/highway easement, or transmission line easement, or a more complicated aerial easement, parking structure easement, or floating easement.  The scope and terms … Continue Reading

Value Trends of Gas Stations and Car Washes

In a previous post, “What is ‘Just Compensation’ For Gas Station Acquisitions,” we explored various methods for valuing gas stations and car washes in an eminent domain action, including a recommendation by a gas station appraisal firm, Retail Petroleum Consultants, to approach such valuation assignments as “special use properties”.  Retail Petroleum has issued another useful article, “Value … Continue Reading

Municipal Condemnation of Privately Held Utilities Continues to be a Hot Issue, but at what Cost?

In January, I spoke at a conference in Austin about efforts by municipalities to condemn privately-held utility companies.  At the time, I figured it would be a one-off presentation on a pretty niche issue, even for eminent domain attorneys.  But next month, I’ll be speaking on a variation of that topic at CLE International’s 2016 Eminent … Continue Reading

USPAP to Remain the Sole Standard of Valuation Practice in California for Real Estate Appraisers

Last summer, I wrote about the Appraisal Institute’s controversial effort to promote legislation in California (known as AB 624) that would enable licensed real estate appraisers performing appraisals for non-federally-related transactions to use any nationally or internationally recognized standard of valuation. I commented at the time that it wasn’t difficult to “envision a parade of … Continue Reading

Two Decisions out of San Diego Remind Us to Follow the Rules

We don’t often see multiple takings-related cases in one week, but last week we saw three.  The California Supreme Court’s decision in Property Reserve was obviously the most important, but the Fourth Appellate District Court of Appeal in San Diego also issued two decisions in the same week.  Although both of these opinions are unpublished … Continue Reading

Can Technology Preserve Government Rights of Entry?

As we await the California Supreme Court’s decision in the Property Reserve case (see related posts here and here), many government agencies are faced with the question of what they will do if the justices deem the current right of entry procedures unconstitutional.  Perhaps technology can come to the rescue. Many in the real estate industry are … Continue Reading

Eminent Domain Case Analyzes Mitigation Credits as a Highest and Best Use

Eminent domain practitioners are well versed in analyzing a property’s highest and best use.  Under these principles, a property being condemned is not necessarily valued based on its current, existing use.  Where the appraiser can show that the property’s actual value is based on a different use, that use can often be the foundation for … Continue Reading

The $30 Million Access Easement

When public agencies acquire property for public projects, many times only a portion of the property is required.  And, the government usually seeks various types property interests:  (i) permanent easements for street purposes, drainage, utilities, slope, aerial, or access rights, (ii) temporary construction easements, or (iii) fee interests, to name a few.  One common misconception among … Continue Reading
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